He’s Kicking Ass

Yesterday we got the results from Dave’s four week labs, including another viral load count.  The first test, at two weeks, showed no change.  It was actually higher than the last viral load test he had, at the end of January.  I figured his viral load most likely went up between the end of January and the start of his treatment in early April, which is why the test done two weeks into treatment showed a higher number than the January test.

Well, we finally got some GOOD news.  His two week viral count was over 4 million.  His four week count, the one taken last week right before he started Victrelis, was 1.6 million.  !!!!  That’s a huge drop in two weeks; when you consider that Victrelis is supposed to be the new wonder drug that really packs a whollop, it gives us confidence that his next test, at six weeks (with two weeks of Victrelis under his belt) will be amazing.  We’re staying positive and confident here!

I have to confess, I was really worried about him starting this treatment.  There are a lot of horror stories out there, and he had the added unknown of being a leukemia survivor and the recipient of a bone marrow transplant.  Even though his doctors at the VA have all coordinated for his treatment and they were confident that his body could handle it, it still scared me.  I was prepared for him to spend 6 to 11 months basically just sleeping, dealing with side effects, and taking medicine.

So far since he started treatment five weeks ago, he’s painted Mom’s kitchen, replaced the starter and battery on our car, tore out the carpet and put down laminate flooring in our bedroom (good grief, what an improvement!) and he’s currently painting a new shelf/stand for a TV downstairs.  He’s making me feel lazy!

In the interest of full disclosure, he does admit that a big outpouring of physical energy will leave him pretty exhausted for a while afterward.  He mowed the lawn yesterday morning and was crashed out on the couch in the afternoon (and falling asleep by 9:30 that night).  It took him about two days to recover from the long car drive to Michigan, and the same for replacing the flooring in the bedroom.

He does have days where he wakes up and just has no energy.  There’s no rhyme or reason to it – it just happens, and he has to accept that it will be a day when he’s spending most of the day napping.  One of the bigger frustrations for him is that taking a nap doesn’t recharge his batteries the way it used to; he often wakes up feeling just as wiped out as he did when he went to sleep.  So far, though, he hasn’t had a bunch of bad days in a row.  He usually bounces back after a day of downtime.  I can tell just by looking at his eyes if he’s fighting to stay upright or if he’s feeling full of piss and vinegar.

Even though our checkbook wouldn’t agree, it really is a good thing that the business is slower now and he can just check out and relax all day if he needs to.  I’m so glad that he’s in a position to be able to do as his body dictates and sleep when and if it’s required, or go out and do the projects and activities he wants to do.

Even though he’s dealing with random tiredness, there have been positive physical changes.  For about six months before he started treatment for his Hepatitis C, he was getting pains in the area of his liver – pains that were fairly new and starting to bother him.  After he’d been on treatment for three or four weeks, he noticed the pain was completely gone.  That was right after we got the viral load test results that didn’t show any changes.  Instead of being discouraged, he told me that he KNEW good things were happening because that pain was gone.

Since he started Victrelis, he hasn’t had a rash.  He had one day of nausea, the morning after his 10 pm PEG-interferon injection and Victrelis dose; he thinks it was just the combination of both together that was a bit much to handle.  Every now and then he does notice a metallic taste in his mouth, so he’ll reach for hard candy or candied ginger to get rid of it.

We really believe he’ll qualify for the 28 week treatment (versus 48 weeks) so:  Five weeks down, 23 weeks to go!

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About wendiwendy

I'm a real-life bionic woman.

Posted on May 14, 2013, in Family, Medical Visits, Not Related to Hearing Loss and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. That is so great to hear! Go Dave go!

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  2. Hi, have been on the pegasus, ribivarin and telapuir for almost 4 weeks my Doctor tested my viral load and said if it’s not down to 1000 will have to stop treatment. My blood work came back today everything is dropping and he told me to cut back on my ribavarin. Is anyone doing the new 3 medication treatment? I thought they waited 3 months to test viral load before they would stop treatment for non response.

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